Assumptions often drive us to dead ends, they are triggered by our fears. It is easier to follow spoken tracks, to come to conclusions than to leave doubt and loose screws in our reasonings: the flaws inside our beliefs.

 

We are good by nature but corrupted by society

Jean Jacques Rousseau

 

By Gustavo Osorio

One of my closest friends has suggested me several series over the years, most of them from Japanese animators. Some of those series, anime would be a more accurate word to use, develop insights to political, economic and religious structures, other ones focus on the self: they question perceptions and senses of liberty within a person through their role in a society.

However, this is not exclusive of anime. Netflix has brought a range of possibilities when talking about content that follows these same lines of thought. To question the basics of our understanding of the structures of our world, the social arrangements we have made through time in order to come to behaviors such as the ones we perceive “today”, is, at least to me, a new tendency in entertainment.

These series have step aside, their themes are not those of murder or sex, gossips or scandals, battles or affairs, but those of ideas and knowledge, the breakthrough of paradigms in investigation and the use of academic development in tangible situations. Mindhunter and Manhunt: Unabomber have gone differently about their plots, while it is possible to relate them to specific events, as well as to any of the themes above mentioned, Joe Penhall (creator of Mindhunter), Andrew Sodroski, Jim Clemente, and Tony Gittelson (creators of Manhunt: Unabomber) have zoom in their attention on the starting relationships between behavioral science, compare linguistics and FBI investigations.

Stretching boundaries isn’t always easy, however going through common scenarios that might seem well fed by the media and yet, finding a new way to look at them, is an achievement worth mentioning.

The idea mere idea of crime as awful and disgraceful is disputed, judgement is anything but a path to ignorance. The main characters in both series are aesthetics, they do not look forward to violence as an act of madness, instead they find a meaning within it. Mindhunter sketches the issues of a group of investigators trying to decipher different criminal minds, while Manhunt: Unabomber draws the importance of words in order to discern a man’s thought.

Assumptions often drive us to dead ends, they are trigger by our fears. It is easier to follow spoken tracks, to come to conclusions than leave doubt and loose screws in our reasonings: the flaws inside our beliefs.

It is rather a relief to come across these entanglement attempts in entertainment. It is up to the reader to take a step aside as well, and try a content not derived from dull logics or sketches which feature beauty as their main argument, but to watch the complexity of our minds and our behaviors: the reasons inside violence.